Your action plan for when an athlete screws up

The first time I kicked someone off my team, I yelled.

It wasn't the way I wanted to handle it and...I hadn't yet learned another way. Kicking her off the team was also partly my fault.

In my early days as a Head Coach, I resisted confronting my athletes to hold them accountable. I had a young woman on my team who clearly wasn't doing her part. She was on a totally different page than the rest of the team. 

The writing was on the wall during the first week of practice. Yet, I ignored little problems and minimized her mistakes. I basically did everything I could to avoid a confrontation.

I didn't give this athlete feedback on where she was falling short - until I clearly had to do something as the head coach to salvage my team. Her teammates had to endure my lack of action. I would get irritable with other athletes - when it was her I was frustrated with. I kept telling myself she’d figure it out somehow… until it was too late. 

Since shifting careers, I’ve spent thousands of dollars on my own coaching, taken countless seminars and continuing education classes, and read hundreds of books and articles. I really wish I knew then what I know now!

And while I can’t go back and change the way I coached back then, I can pass along simple strategies and a different perspective to the coaches I work with now.

I really hope that this will help spend less time avoiding and procrastinating having these hard conversations and more time doing what you love as a coach - connecting with your athletes. 

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What To Do When an Athlete Screws Up

The first time I kicked someone off my team, I yelled.

It wasn't the way I wanted to handle it and...I hadn't yet learned another way. Kicking her off the team was also partly my fault.

In my early days as a Head Coach, I resisted confronting my athletes to hold them accountable. I had a young woman on my team who clearly wasn't doing her part and on a totally different page than the rest of the team. 

The writing was on the wall during the first week of practice. Yet, I ignored little problems and minimized her mistakes. I basically did everything I could to avoid a confrontation.

I didn't give her feedback on where she was falling short - until I clearly had to do something as the head coach to salvage my team. They had to endure my lack of action. I would get irritable with other athletes - when it was her I was frustrated with. I kept telling myself she’d figure it out somehow… until it was too late. 

Since shifting careers, I’ve spent thousands of dollars on my own coaching, taken countless seminars and continuing education classes, and read hundreds of books and articles. I really wish I had learned these things when I was coaching!

I've compiled a simple strategy to be able to pass it along to you...so you can spend less time spinning your wheels and more time doing what you love as a coach - connecting with your athletes. 

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Mistakes coaches make (thinking they're doing the right thing)

1 – Not scheduling time to dream

You may believe the only to get things done is to be doing something. That's not always the case.

If you don’t take time away from your team for visioning and thinking, it’s easy to react to everything. 

Teams are dynamic and ever-changing (Just like you!) Take time to think about who you want to be, where you want to go, and what you want to do.

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