Your REAL Value As A Coach (HINT: It's Not What the Scoreboard Says)

I caught up with a coach the other day who was really bummed out.

She had just finished her season.

Her team had competed well, yet she was frustrated.

Her competitors also had strong performances.

Last year her team would have been four places higher in the overall team standings...with the same results. She told her team what she thought they were capable of achieving...they did it...and yet those results weren't reflected on the scoreboard.

She had originally planned to take some much needed downtime after the season.

Now, she was questioning her time off..."What would my boss say if I take time off...when what I really need is to sign another recruit to help our team next season? I don't feel we did well enough for me to deserve any kind of a break."

I'm wondering if you can relate? Have you ever felt like this? 

POST SEASON DIP

There can be a normal let down at the end of the season - no matter how well your team performed. 

Many coaches - if they're being honest - either feel flawed in some way OR feel the need to constantly prove themselves. 

Unless you've just won the national championship, there's always room to improve.

Even then, if you've talked to any national championship coach after they've won...the pressure and expectations simply go up instead of down.

It's so easy to let the results on the scoreboard define you.

It's also easy to let the outside world dictate how you FEEL about yourself.

It's easy...and it's not helpful! 

This kind of thinking makes you shrink and contract.  This kind of thinking does not move you forward. 

These kinds of thoughts don't help you grow and expand. 

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What Makes A Coach Want To Quit?

I get calls from coaches every season.

They want to come to a coaching summit, but they're not even sure if they want to coach next season.

They think they want to quit.

They ask, “Should I even come to the summit?

They worry about "being a distraction" or "being a downer" to the group.

When I ask them what's up, it usually goes something like this:

"It was a really long, hard season. I haven’t talked to anyone else about the challenges I’m facing. It’s just gotten worse and worse all season long. Even if I had someone to talk to, I wouldn’t even know where to start!”

- OR -

"I’m the only female on my staff. There are things that I would do so differently. Maybe it’s just me though. I bring things up - that I think are important and they just blow it off. Or…they say it’s a good idea but things never ever change. I feel like all my feedback and ideas are just a total waste of time. I’m so frustrated. I think I'm just done with coaching."

- OR -

"I worked so hard this year. We didn't get the results I was hoping for...again. It’s almost as if any decision I make is going to come with complaints and resistance - from athletes, parents, the administration….and even my staff. I seriously can't win! I'm not sure it's worth all this effort."

I'd imagine there isn’t a single coach out there who hasn’t questioned their decision to be a coach - at least once (or maybe multiple times) - every single year.

When a coach brings up the possibility of quitting at a summit, they are often surprised to find out how many other coaches have been there, too.

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What makes coaches want to quit?

It happens every year. Sometimes more than once.

A coach calls me up after their season. They want to come to a coaching summit, but they're not even sure if they want to coach next season. They are thinking of quitting.

They ask me if they should still come to the summit. They're worried about "being a distraction" or "being a total downer" to everyone in the group.

When I ask them what's up, it usually goes something like this:

"It was a really long, hard season. I feel disconnected. There's no one I can talk to about the challenges that come up. I don't even know where to start."

OR...

"I work on a staff with all male coaches...and they just don't get it. They don't get ME! I try to bring things up that I think are important and they blow it off. I end up getting so frustrated. I think I'm just done with coaching."

OR...

"I just worked so hard this year and didn't get the results I was hoping for...again. The athletes on my team complain about everything. I just can't win with them! I'm not sure it's worth all this effort."

I'd imagine that every single coach has questioned their decision to be a coach - at least once (maybe many times) every single year. 

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Four Questions To Answer To Understand Your Value As A Coach (HINT: it's not what the scoreboard says)

I caught up with a coach the other day who was really bummed out.

Her team had competed well, yet she was frustrated. The competition also had strong performances. Last year her team would have been four places higher in the overall team standings...with the same results. She told her team what she thought they were capable of achieving...they did it...and yet those results weren't reflected on the scoreboard.

She had originally planned to take some much needed downtime after the season. Now, she was questioning her time off..."What would my boss say if I take time off...when what I really need is to sign another recruit to help our team next season? I don't feel we did well enough for me to deserve a vacation."

I'm wondering if you can relate. Have you ever felt like this? 

There can be a normal let down at the end of the season - no matter how well you're team has performed.  Many coaches - if they're being honest - either feel flawed in some way OR feel the need to constantly prove themselves.  Unless you've just won the national championship, there's always room to improve. (Even then, if you've talked to any national championship coach after they've won...the pressure and expectations simply go up instead of down.)

It's so easy to let the results on the scoreboard define you. It's easy to let the outside world dictate how you FEEL about yourself. It's easy...and it's not helpful!  This kind of thinking makes you shrink and contract.  This kind of thinking does not move you forward.  These thoughts don't help you grow and expand. 

That's why I teach coaches how to identify and focus more on their true value. 

I'm not talking about value as in a higher salary.  (Although recognizing your value can help you be more confident when you do go in to ask for a raise.)

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