What Makes A Coach Want To Quit?

I get calls from coaches every season.

They want to come to a coaching summit, but they're not even sure if they want to coach next season.

They think they want to quit.

They ask, “Should I even come to the summit?

They worry about "being a distraction" or "being a downer" to the group.

When I ask them what's up, it usually goes something like this:

"It was a really long, hard season. I haven’t talked to anyone else about the challenges I’m facing. It’s just gotten worse and worse all season long. Even if I had someone to talk to, I wouldn’t even know where to start!”

- OR -

"I’m the only female on my staff. There are things that I would do so differently. Maybe it’s just me though. I bring things up - that I think are important and they just blow it off. Or…they say it’s a good idea but things never ever change. I feel like all my feedback and ideas are just a total waste of time. I’m so frustrated. I think I'm just done with coaching."

- OR -

"I worked so hard this year. We didn't get the results I was hoping for...again. It’s almost as if any decision I make is going to come with complaints and resistance - from athletes, parents, the administration….and even my staff. I seriously can't win! I'm not sure it's worth all this effort."

I'd imagine there isn’t a single coach out there who hasn’t questioned their decision to be a coach - at least once (or maybe multiple times) - every single year.

When a coach brings up the possibility of quitting at a summit, they are often surprised to find out how many other coaches have been there, too.

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What makes coaches want to quit?

It happens every year. Sometimes more than once.

A coach calls me up after their season. They want to come to a coaching summit, but they're not even sure if they want to coach next season. They are thinking of quitting.

They ask me if they should still come to the summit. They're worried about "being a distraction" or "being a total downer" to everyone in the group.

When I ask them what's up, it usually goes something like this:

"It was a really long, hard season. I feel disconnected. There's no one I can talk to about the challenges that come up. I don't even know where to start."

OR...

"I work on a staff with all male coaches...and they just don't get it. They don't get ME! I try to bring things up that I think are important and they blow it off. I end up getting so frustrated. I think I'm just done with coaching."

OR...

"I just worked so hard this year and didn't get the results I was hoping for...again. The athletes on my team complain about everything. I just can't win with them! I'm not sure it's worth all this effort."

I'd imagine that every single coach has questioned their decision to be a coach - at least once (maybe many times) every single year. 

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